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Early Detection Just Got VERY High Tech

FotoFinder Automated Total Body Mapping Studio

“Early detection” is something I talk about a lot.  That is for good reason: skin cancer is not only the most common form of cancer in the United States, it is also the most curable – that is, IF it is detected early.  This is why I talk just as much about the importance of regular full body exams.

May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month, so this is an especially good time to mention a powerful new early detection tool I’ve just added to my practice:  FotoFinder.  This breakthrough technology is truly one of the most impactful medical devices I have seen in my career.

FotoFinder combines the very best photographic equipment and German robotic engineering in a way that superbly augments the dermatology professional during full body exams.

Here’s how it works: The computer-controlled machine captures highly detailed photographs of the entire skin surface and merges them into a comprehensive Total Body Map.  It then employs artificial intelligence to meticulously compare current skin conditions to earlier “baseline” images.  If it “sees” new moles, or even minute changes in existing moles, it automatically flags them for detailed follow up by the professional.  The mapping and analysis process take just 20 minutes.  It is amazing technology that will greatly advance early detection of skin cancer.

Baseline: FotoFinder Total Body Map

Follow Up: Updated Body Map, with moles highlighted for further examination

When I saw this sophisticated device in action, I knew immediately I need to bring this to our patients.  The Dermatologic Surgery Center of Washington is the first and only practice in the Washington, DC region to install this significant advancement in the science of early detection.

Since we installed the system in January, I am often asked who should consider FotoFinder early detection technology?  If you can answer yes to any of these questions, I recommend we discuss if FotoFinder is right for you:

  • Do you have a history of melanoma or other skin cancer?
  • Do you have a family history of skin cancer?
  • Do you have many moles – more than 50?
  • Do you have large moles – 2 inches in diameter or larger?
  • Do you see changes in a mole or have new moles?
  • Do you have a history of a severe, blistering sunburn as a child or adolescent?
  • Do you have very light skin?
  • Are you exposed to strong sunlight on a regular basis?

Skin Cancer Awareness Month is a great time to make an appointment with one of our talented dermatology professionals for your next full body exam – and create your baseline Total Body Map with FotoFinder.

Click here to make an appointment online or call us at 301-652-8081.

 

All the photos used are courtesy: FotoFinder Systems, Inc.

bride on beach

A Breakthrough In Melanoma Detection

Are you reluctant to undergo a skin biopsy because of the potential for a scar? We have good news. There is a new, non-invasive melanoma detection method to check suspicious dark moles. Read the story below by Dr. Maral Skelsey and learn more about DermTech, a “bladeless biopsy.”

melanoma

Amelanotic Melanoma: Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

melanomaA patient recently came to the office concerned about a new dark mole on her leg. During her full body skin examination, I noticed a pink bump on her back.  I asked her about it and she said it was a bug bite that was taking a long time to heal.  Because of the appearance of the lesion when I examined it with a dermatoscope, I recommended a biopsy. Unfortunately, the pink spot on her back turned out to be a melanoma. The mole on her leg was benign.

 

Most patients are concerned when they spot a new dark mole, but it’s not widely recognized that melanoma can present as a pink or colorless skin lesion. Amelanotic melanoma is a serious form of skin cancer where the cells do not make melanin or pigment. It is responsible for approximately 2-20% of melanoma cases1. Because of their lack of color, diagnosis of this type of melanoma may be delayed until it reaches an advanced stage.

Symptoms

One of the most obvious symptoms of amelanotic melanoma is the sudden appearance of a red, pink, or skin-colored spot on your body where it wasn’t before. Melanomas also grow and may change shape, becoming a larger bump over time. Amelanotic melanoma may not present with the classic ABCD criteria (Asymmetry, Border Irregularity, Color variation, and Large Diameter) that are typically associated with melanoma warning signs. Expanding the ABCD warning signs to include the 3 Rs (Red, Raised, Recent change) may help in the early detection of amelanotic melanoma2. It is also estimated that about 25% of melanomas of the nail are amelanotic, so checking your nails should be a regular part of self-skin examinations. It is important to note that melanoma may present differently in individuals of color, therefore regular self-skin examinations are essential in the early detection of these skin cancers.

Causes

Melanoma occurs when the DNA in your skin cells becomes damaged, which can cause the cells to grow out of control and become cancerous. Exposure to the sun for long periods of time can damage your skin cells and increase your risk for melanoma. This risk is increased in patients with fairer skin, individuals of European descent, those with many moles (especially 50 or more), a family history of melanoma, and patients with a weakened immune system from an existing condition3. The use of tanning beds has also been associated with an increased risk for melanoma and should be avoided4.

Treatment

The most common treatment for melanoma is surgical removal.  However, melanoma can spread to the lymph nodes, necessitating the removal of one or more nodes. Advanced melanoma may need to be treated with chemotherapy and/or radiation. Biological therapy (or drugs that aid your immune system in killing cancer cells) as well as targeted therapy (medications that weaken cancer cells) are other common melanoma therapies. Patients with a history of a previous melanoma are 4 times more likely than the general population to develop a subsequent invasive melanoma, therefore full body skin examinations should be performed by a dermatologist every 3 months after a melanoma diagnosis.

 

References:
1.         Thomas, N.E., Kricker, A., & Waxweiler, W. Comparison of Clinicopathologic Features and Survival of Histopathologically Amelanotic and Pigmented Melanomas: A Population-Based Study. JAMA Dermatol. 2014;150(12):1306-1314. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2014.1348
2.         Kim, S.J., Park, H.J., Lee, J.Y., Cho, B.K., A Case of Subungual Melanoma. Ann Dermatol. 2008 Mar; 20(1): 26–28. Published online 2008 Mar 31. doi:  10.5021/ad.2008.20.1.26
3.         American Cancer Society. Risk Factors for Melanoma Skin Cancer. Available online at: https://www.cancer.org/cancer/melanoma-skin-cancer/causes-risks-prevention/risk-factors.html
4.         American Academy of Dermatology. Indoor Tanning. Available online at: https://www.aad.org/media/stats/prevention-and-care