Trending Now: Collagen Supplements for Anti-Aging

If you read beauty blogs and magazines, chances are you have heard of the latest craze to hit the anti-aging market — collagen supplements. Collagen supplements claim to make the skin look younger, may help with brittle nails, and may even reduce the appearance of cellulite. But do they really work? We examined the current scientific literature to determine if collagen supplementation can transform your skin and make you look years younger.

What is collagen?

Collagen is the most abundant protein in the body and is responsible for the structure, stability, and strength of the underlying tissues. The deposition of collagen into the skin gradually decreases over time as the skin ages, but it can be accelerated due to photoaging from excessive sun exposure. Aside from aging, the biggest reason individuals are deficient in collagen is a poor diet. Consuming animal and vegetable sources that are protein-rich, such as beef, chicken, fish, beans, eggs, and dairy products can help ensure adequate intake of collagen.

The science:

Several limited studies have shown promising results in individuals taking collagen supplements for their skin. These studies have noted benefits in transepidermal water loss (skin hydration), skin elasticity, roughness, and wrinkles. Two separate studies showed a possible benefit of collagen supplementation in patients who have brittle nail syndrome as well as in women who suffer from moderate cellulite. Animal studies further revealed that administering collagen hydrolysates to mice for 6 months led to significantly increased collagen content and density of the skin.

Can I benefit from taking a collagen supplement?

If you are eating a healthy diet and feeding your body all of the nutrients it needs to make collagen, you probably do not need a supplement. However, as the body ages, you may no longer absorb or synthesize nutrients as efficiently as you used to. Taking a collagen supplement can make up for a deficiency if it is present. A 2017 study in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry showed that collagen hydrolysates can be transferred through the bloodstream directly to the skin, which explains the probable pathway for the beneficial effects of taking a supplement. However, some scientists postulate that the skin is a much lower priority to the body than major muscles, like the heart, diaphragm, and brain, where collagen will be distributed first. Therefore, only patients with a significant deficiency will likely benefit from taking collagen supplements. In addition, the cost and bulk of supplementation may be prohibitive for patients. Supplements in pill form require swallowing six a day to get a 6-gram dose. Powders are often double the price of pills, running from $15-$40 for a month’s supply.

Bottom line:

Limited studies on the benefits of collagen supplements have shown some promise, however, questions remain regarding which patients will benefit and how much collagen is actually absorbed into the skin. Cost and administration may be factors in compliance. It should be noted that for individuals who wish to add more collagen to their diet, bone broth—while not in hydrolysate form—offers six grams of collagen-rich protein and may be a tastier way to get your collagen fix.

 

 

References

  1. Jhawar, N., Wang, J. & Saedi, N. Oral collagen supplementation for skin aging: a fad of the future? Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, August 14, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1111/jocd.13096
  2. Choi, F.D., Sung, C.T., Juhasz, M., Mesinkovska, N.A. Oral collagen supplementation: A systematic review of dermatological applications. Journal of Drugs in Dermatology. 2019; 18(1): 9-16.
  3. Vollmer, D.L., West, V.A., & Lephart, E.D. Enhancing skin health by oral administration of natural compounds and minerals with implications to the dermal microbiome. J. Mol. Sci.201819(10), 3059.
  4. Hexsel, D., Zague, V., Schunck, M., Siega, C., Camozzato, F. & Oesser, S. Oral Supplementation with specific bioactive collagen peptides improves nail growth and reduces symptoms of brittle nails. Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology; August 2017, available online at: https://doi.org/10.1111/jocd.12393.
  5. Krieger, E. Collagen supplements show early promise for skin and joints, but don’t stock up yet. March 26, 2018, The Washington Post. Available online at: https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/wellness/collagen-supplements-show-early-promise-for-skin-nails-and-joints/2018/03/23/1cd480e2-27d6-11e8-bc72-077aa4dab9ef_story.html
  6. Schunck, M. Zague, V., Oesser, S., & Proksch, E. Dietary supplementation with specific collagen peptides has a body mass index-dependent beneficial effect on cellulite morphology. Journal of Medicinal Food. Dec 17, 2015: Available online at: https://doi.org/10.1089/jmf.2015.0022
  7. Cruel, J. Does drinking collagen supplements actually do anything for your skin? Self, August 22, 2017. Available online at: https://www.self.com/story/collagen-supplements.

How Dermatologists Use Lasers and Other Light-Based Devices

Rocket projected onto the Washington Monument during the celebration of the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11.

As we celebrate the spectacular achievement of the moon landing 50 years ago, we can reflect on the technological advances that have had an impact on dermatology. In the half century since Dr. Leon Goldman pioneered the medical application of lasers, they have become integral to state-of-the- art dermatology practices. So how do dermatologists use lasers and other light-based devices?

Uses for Laser, Light and Energy-based Devices

Remove unwanted hair

Lasers remove unwanted hair from the face and body by targeting the pigment of the hair and damaging its follicle so that hair growth is slowed. In order for lasers to be effective, the hair must be treated while in its “active growth” phase. This is why multiple (usually six to eight) treatments, spaced four weeks apart on the face, and as much as eight weeks apart on the body, are needed to achieve good results. The same lasers are also effective for excessive sweating or hyperhidrosis. Note: Only specific lasers are appropriate for darker skin types, and those with tanned skin should avoid the treatment.

Do away with those age spots

Sun damage and aging can result in unwanted brown spots, called lentigines, on sun-exposed areas such as the face, chest and hands. Those spots can successfully be treated with Q-switched lasers and IPL (Intense Pulsed Light) devices. Several treatments may be required to achieve optimal results.

Treat redness and broken blood vessels

Lasers are effective at treating skin redness from conditions such as rosacea as well as benign vascular growths such as angiomas and broken blood vessels that can occur from sun damage. The treatment works because lasers at certain wavelengths can target hemoglobin that is found in blood. Typically one to a few treatments may be needed for optimal results. It is important to use a broad-spectrum sunscreen after the treatment.

Banish those breakouts

Lasers and light-based devices can successfully treat mild to moderate acne. While conventional methods to get rid of acne include topical and oral medications, such as antibiotics and retinoids, the use of photodynamic therapy can be effective in achieving long-lasting clear skin. Photodynamic therapy combines the use of a photosensitizing chemical that is absorbed both by the oil glands and the bacteria that produce acne – followed by a light source or laser to activate the chemical. This results in shrinkage of the oil glands and killing of the bacteria.

Refresh and rejuvenate

A newer generation of devices today allows for skin resurfacing that removes the top layer of skin to eliminate signs of aging and photodamage such as fine lines, wrinkles, crepiness and brown spots as well as reducing enlarged pores – all with minimal downtime.

Soften the look of scars

Lasers can improve the appearance of scars – whether they were caused by acne, trauma or surgery. Some devices – like the pulsed dye laser – can help reduce the redness associated with scars. Fractional resurfacing lasers can successfully improve a scar’s texture and tone. Depending on which device is used, there may be a period of downtime following the treatment and a need for several treatments.

Take care of that ‘turkey neck’

With age comes a loss in collagen, which can result in loose skin on the neck and under the chin – affectionately known as “turkey neck.” Fortunately, there are non-invasive technologies that utilize ultrasound and radiofrequency to stimulate collagen production – resulting in skin tightening and lifting. These treatments also can be used for wrinkles on the décolletage, that crepe-paper look on the upper chest.

Rethink the ink

Fortunately there are options for those 20 percent of people who experience tattoo regret. Q-switched lasers have been used for decades to heat up and destroy the tattoo ink particles, usually over multiple treatments. Newer technology using ultra-short bursts of energy can achieve the same results in fewer treatments.

If you think one of these treatments could be right for you, contact us to schedule a consultation. Located in Chevy Chase, MD, our dermatology office serves the greater Washington D.C. area.

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Infini Wrinkle Reduction

Infini is a technology developed for surgical scar improvement that can also enhance and rejuvenate aging skin, providing consistent results and low downtime.

One of the many benefits of Infini is that it can be used at any time of the year and on any skin. Infini does not directly affect the epidermis. It is a non-invasive procedure that addresses both post-operative scars and the skin laxity such as wrinkles and textural changes that are a consequence of sun exposure.

Q: What is this procedure good for?
A: Overall skin rejuvenation; fine lines and wrinkles, improving tone and textural changes- especially “crepey skin”, sagging skin, acne scarring

Q: What parts of the face/ neck can it improve?
A: Brows, crows feet, upper lip, neck and chest

Q: How does it work?
A: Energy delivered into the skin stimulates the natural growth of collagen and elastin—natural  “scaffolding.”

Q: Why is radio-frequency an important addition to microneedling?
A: The radio-frequency delivered via gold-plated microneedles is a powerful stimulant for new collagen production.

Q: What preparation is involved?
A: Application of a topical numbing cream in the office for approximately 2 hours

Q: How long is the procedure?
A: About 30 min

Q: What is the downtime?
A: There is redness and swelling for approximately 48 hours, which may take up to a week to resolve. Make-up may be applied after 48 hours

Q: How quickly will I see results?
A: It takes a few weeks to begin to see results. Improvement continues over a period of up to 6 months

Have questions or want to make an appointment at Dermatologic Surgery Center of Washington? Click here to contact us.

Blue lagoon

The Benefits of the Blue Lagoon

Blue lagoon

If you haven’t been to Iceland yet, chances are you know at least a dozen people who have taken the short flight to Reykjavik and spent a few days among the volcanoes, glaciers and geysers.

Last year more than 2 million tourists went to the Island of Fire and Ice with many of them taking a mineral bath in the iconic Blue Lagoon. I hate to be a lemming, but I wanted to see what drove so many to this sparsely populated island and learn first-hand about the dermatologic potential of Iceland’s most famous destination.

I was surprised to discover that the Blue Lagoon is not one of Mother Nature’s best works, but a beautiful man-made spa utilizing naturally occurring geothermal energy in the form of super heated water extracted from a mile below the earth’s surface. It is an ingenious re-use of the excess water from an adjacent power plant. The water is a mix of fresh and seawater and, according to the spa website, the unique algae plants and high concentration of silica directly benefit the skin. They claim the anti-bacterial effects of silica improve psoriasis and eczema and that the mineral water prevents premature aging.

I had to try it, so we booked a day at the Blue Lagoon Retreat, touted as a “transformative journey into volcanic earth.” It’s definitely a transformative setting, with canals and pools of beautiful blue-white water snaking through volcanic cliffs, overlooking mountains and a starkly spectacular landscape. The experience is soothing and relaxing. Once I was able to pull myself out of the warm water I performed the signature “ritual” using scrubs of lava sand and salt, a cleansing silica mask and moisturizing algae oil. It was a sublime end to a memorable day.

Effects of Blue Lagoon Water

According to Icelandic dermatologist Jenna Huld Eysteinsdottir, research on the effects of the Blue Lagoon’s algae and silica on skin cells showed an increase in the genes that prevent skin aging. These were “in vitro” laboratory studies, however, and I am not aware of any that looked at actual patients. Additionally, there is a great deal of evidence that silica, the star ingredient in Blue Lagoon’s skin care line, is vital for healthy joints, skin, nails, teeth and bones. While it is less clear that applying large amounts of silica on the skin will result in reversal of aging, this pure white mineral is very effective in the absorption of oil and can have a positive role in masks for those with acne, eczema and psoriasis. It’s found in many cosmetic products because it improves the appearance of lines and pores, but as far as I know, only temporarily.

Seeking more “in vivo” evidence of the Blue Lagoon’s claims, I looked around at the Icelanders’ skin. With a population of a little more than 300,000 in a sea of tourists, spotting a native Icelander is almost as challenging as identifying one of the elves that are central to the Icelandic sagas and identity. There is no question though that most natives have exceptionally healthy skin – unlined and evenly pigmented. Lack of sunlight may play a role, however, as they live at a latitude with only 5 hours of daylight in winter.

Is the Blue Lagoon Worth it?

So, what’s the upshot? After a few hours of soaking and scrubbing in the ethereal waters of the Blue Lagoon I felt absolutely fantastic and renewed.  From a dermatologist’s perspective there is not yet enough science to support its skin anti-aging claims, but I would still recommend the experience, if only for the restorative powers to one’s psyche. There will be undoubtedly more data on the horizon, and I will be on the lookout. In the meantime, if you have the chance, check the Blue Lagoon out for yourself.

 

Takk Fyrir!

 

How Chemical Peels Rejuvenate the Skin

Sun exposure can cause discoloration of the skin as well as roughness and wrinkling. This damaged skin can be repaired to a large degree with a variety of rejuvenating treatments.

One of the methods that restores the skin’s natural beauty without significant downtime is a chemical peel. Peels are a great way to brighten the skin and reduce discoloration.

History of Chemical Peels

Interestingly these procedures have been performed for centuries.  The ancient Egyptians used acids to peel the skin as early as 1550 B.C. Dermatologists have been doing the modern day version for more than half a century. The procedures we use today have been greatly refined, and so has our approach to using them.

Modern Chemical Peels

Peels can be tailored for skin type and the type of skin damage. It’s not a “one size fits all approach to anti-aging. Peeling agents include an alphabet soup of  some combination of the following: salicylic, retinoic, mandelic, phytic, and tricholoracetic acids. We choose an agent or agents based on the tone and condition of the skin as well as the desired outcome.

Today’s chemical peels often infuse the skin with ingredients that encourage its own natural processes such as building collagen to diminish wrinkles and improve tone. They can also be combined with other procedures such as microneedling to enhance the penetration of active agents.

Different Types of Chemical Peels

Here’s a primer on peels.  A light peel, commonly called a lunchtime peel, gently exfoliates only the outer layer of skin. This treatment can improve mild discoloration as well as refresh the face, neck, chest or hands. Regular light  peels for acne work well with other treatments and can help reduce the need for prescription oral antibiotics. Light peels are also an excellent solution for patients of color looking to lighten the skin.

To get the results you seek from a light peel, you will need multiple treatments, depending on your goals. Melasma or hyperpigmentation on the face will require several sessions of chemical exfoliation to eliminate the pigment.

A medium peel penetrates the outer and middle layers of skin to improve age spots, fine lines and wrinkles, freckles and moderate skin discoloration. It also can be used to smooth rough skin and treat precancerous skin growths such as actinic keratoses.

Deeper peels are also designed to penetrate the middle layer of skin to remove moderate lines, age spots, freckles and shallow scars.

Preparing for a Chemical Peel

Preparation for a peel is as important as the peel itself.  You may be given instructions on a skin care plan- especially if you have darker skin tones- for the 2-4 weeks preceding a peel. After your peel you we will tell you how to care for your skin, when it’s safe to begin wearing makeup and what you should be using to maintain the benefits of your peel.

Peels are a customizable approach to healthy anti-aging and a natural aesthetic.

Contact us with questions and to book your appointment.